How Can I Conserve Water at Home?

Water is Worth Saving!

We all know that water is a precious resource, but sometimes we use more than we really need. This post will help you identify some things in your home that may be using too much water, as well as some things we can all do to cut down on water waste!

Here is a great infographic from PortaPotty.net (that’s right!) on the habits that waste the most water in average homes. These are things we are all guilty of doing, but that are really easy to fix if we just pay a little attention to our actions. Check out their site here for more cool diagrams, graphs, and information on the 25 best ways to conserve water!

savewater

So what do I do at home?

Now that we know some of things that waste the most water, what can we do to change?

Check out this great guidance from HomeAdvisor about steps you can take every day to reduce water consumption in your kitchen, bathroom, and other activities. Water Conservation Throughout the Home

And if you’re looking for ways to conserve water outside, in your garden, flower beds, or even watering your lawn, take a look at these tips from AngiesList! Outdoor Water Consumption and Conservation

How Natural Vegetation Creates Stream Buffers to Protect Waterbodies from Stormwater Pollution (and how you can help build one!)

What is a stream buffer?Image result for riparian buffer

Stream (also called riparian) buffers are strips of trees and other vegetation that:

  • improve water quality by filtering pollutants from stormwater runoff such as oil, fertilizers, pesticides, and dog waste;
  • reduce flooding and erosion by stabilizing stream banks;
  • moderate stream temperature and sunlight, keeping fish and other aquatic life healthy;
  • provide nesting and foraging habitat for many species of birds and animals.

You can help stream buffers purify our water by planting native trees and bushes along your stream or ditch, especially if the bank is bare or eroding. If you already have trees or shrubs along your waterway, simply leave it alone!

Mowing, cutting, and removing buffer vegetation may be regulated in your area, so check with your local government before undertaking landscaping or other projects within 100 feet of any water conveyances. (Selective cutting of understory shrubs and scrub by hand is usually allowed in very small amounts, but it is better to let the vegetation continue its natural regeneration process, which will allow trees to mature, form a canopy, and prevent undergrowth naturally.) Continue reading