New CWEP Stormwater Video Heading to a Theater Near You this December!

We are very excited to release our new animated stormwater video that we’ve been working hard on over the last few months! This 30-second version of our full-length video will be shown in theaters across the region this holiday season, so tell your friends: If you’re headed to the movies between December 15th and 29th, grab a seat a little early to catch this ad rolling a few minutes before the previews start!

You can find our full-length videos in both English and Spanish, as well as individual pollutant spots you can use at home, at work, or in the classroom on our Resources page.

Spotlight on Zebulon – Stormwater Program of the Month!

Each month we will be featuring the outstanding work that our CWEP Partners are doing to keep our stormwater clean around the region and in your communities. This month we’re focusing on Zebulon and how they’ve worked hard over the last few years to grow their program and educate their citizens on the importance of keeping stormwater clean and green!

Since 2012, the Town of Zebulon has worked to raise awareness of stormwater pollution and ways to prevent it. Below is Zebulon’s clean stormwater mascot, Mr. Drip. They have added him to all of their literature and to their website.

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Mr. Drip reminds residents to keep the drains clean.

In 2013, the town of Zebulon purchased a new sweeper and wrapped it with Mr. Drip, the “Only Rain in the Drain” slogan, and the reminder to not put grass clippings, leaves, motor oil, or trash in the storm drains. The message is on display every time Zebulon Public Works sweeps a town street, another aspect of keeping non-stormwater items from going down the drain as the street sweeper catches debris before it can enter the drain. “Stormwater” magazine featured their efforts and the sweeper in their June 2013 edition.

magazine clippingZebulon’s street sweeper made the June 2013 issue of Stormwater Magazine

To reach every resident who receives a municipal water bill, Zebulon developed a series of utility bill stuffers on individual topics and sends them out with the monthly water bills. The stuffers are an easy, low-cost way to keep residents thinking about prevention of stormwater pollution and allow us to promote specific ways the residents can help their town keep the stormwater system clean.

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Several times a year, when the Zebulon Public Works department has the opportunity to speak with youths and adults about stormwater pollution, they demonstrate their Enviroscape model. Tony Rose, Stormwater Superintendent, uses the model to show how fertilizers, chemicals, automotive oil and grease, animal waste, pesticides, and trash enter the storm drain system and travel to nearby rivers and streams. Tony offers tips to prevent contamination and preserve natural waters.

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Tony Rose, Stormwater Superintendent, using the Enviroscape model to explain stormwater pollution and ways to prevent it.

Civic group involvement enhances Zebulon’s efforts to educate people and maintain a clean stormwater system. A team of employees from Glaxo helped Zebulon Public Works mark storm drains in several neighborhoods as reminders to keep trash out of the drains. Rotary Club members participated in a litter sweep along one of Zebulon’s busier routes. All of these efforts help to raise awareness of the need to maintain a clean stormwater system throughout Zebulon.

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Glaxo employee marks storm drain to remind neighbors not to dump in the drain and pollute the Little River. Decal pictured below.

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Rotary Club members collect trash along Alt- Hwy 264E to prevent trash from entering the storm drain system and, eventually, the nearby streams.

Safe, Reliable Water – At Risk!

This blog post was provided by the Value of Water Campaign, which works to promote awareness of the importance of clean drinking water access, and leads the Imagine a Day Without Water efforts. http://thevalueofwater.org/

With all the division in our government, it is easy to forget there are some policy priorities that actually cut across party lines and geographical boundaries. Constituents may have different opinions on health care and tax reform, but they have a lot in common too. They get up in the morning and brush their teeth, use the bathroom, and make coffee. Many of them commute to school or work. They travel with their families on summer vacations and for holidays. They buy groceries and eat at restaurants.

When it comes to the essentials, we really do have more that unites us than divides us, which is why the majority of Americans want the federal government to prioritize investing in infrastructure. Earlier this year, voters were polled on what they wanted the federal government to focus on for a legislative agenda. By a double-digit margin, investment in infrastructure was the most important topic above any other issue. Two thirds of voters said so. And an astonishing 82 percent of Americans said water infrastructure needed to be a top priority. Eighty-two percent of Americans can’t even agree on what day of the week it is!

But if you think about it, water unites all of us. Of course people say it should be a priority. Can you even begin to imagine a day without water? It isn’t just your personal use of water – brushing your teeth, flushing your toilet, taking a shower – though those rituals are vital. Water is also essential to a functioning economy. What is a college campus or a hotel supposed to do if there is no water? They close. How can a restaurant, coffee shop, or brewery serve customers without water to cook, make coffee and beer, or wash the dishes? They can’t. And what about manufacturers – from pharmaceuticals to automobiles – that rely on water? They would grind to a halt too.

An economic study released by the Value of Water Campaign earlier this year found that a single nationwide day without water service would put $43.5 billion of economic activity at risk. But investing in water infrastructure, unfortunately, has not been a priority for decades. The federal government’s investment has declined precipitously, leaving states, localities, and water utilities to make up the difference. Which means it is on localities to raise taxes, or for utilities to charge water rates that can pay for the massive infrastructure system of pumps, plants, and pipes. And the truth is, communities across the country have let those systems deteriorate for far too long.

We saw the tragedy in Flint, Michigan where thousands of residents were affected by tainted water supplies. Water systems in other communities are under threat too, and millions of Americans live in regions that completely lack water infrastructure.

There is no doubt about it – a day without water is a crisis. That is why we are joining with hundreds of groups across the country for Imagine a Day Without Water, because we want people to pay attention to our water systems. This country can do great things, and if 82 percent of Americans agree on something it must be important. Water is a public health issue, it is an economic issue. No community can thrive without water, and every American deserves a safe, reliable, accessible water supply. Let’s demand better, and make sure no American ever has to imagine a day without water again.

As the third annual “Imagine A Day Without Water” approaches on October 12th, we invite you view this video from the Value Water Campaign and imagine how your life would be impacted if we did not have ready access to safe, reliable, and affordable drinking water in this country.

Get Ready for A Day Without Water!

No, we’re not shutting off the pipes. CWEP and our member counties and municipalities are gearing up for A Day Without Water, an annual awareness event run by the Value of Water Campaign, or VWC. The VWC works to educate people about how much water they use and how we can get smarter about our water usage so that “a day without water” can be a pithy title, not reality.

Wanna get started on the fun? Head over to the water calculator to see how much water your household uses in a day. The results may surprise you! And if you do find the number as shocking as we did, no need to worry! The calculator gives you tips and tricks on how to save water — and the planet.

If you’re looking for a more hands-on approach and want to better understand how the water from your faucet gets there, consider booking a tour at a water and wastewater treatment plant in Raleigh, Durham, or Hillsborough. You can also check with your local plant for their tour options. Tours are free of charge and range from 1 to 3 hours. It’s a great after school activity! Make sure to act fast, however, as tour requests typically must be made at least two weeks in advance (so if you want to go on A Day Without Water, you’ll need to request a tour by Thursday, September 28th!).

We’ll be posting in the coming weeks about more ways you can get involved, but if you just can’t wait to learn more, you can check out more information who’s participating and the event itself on the website.

You can learn more about the VWC here.

Mow High, and Let the Clippings Lie…

It’s heating up out there, and the grass is certainly responding! Many of us know we’ll need to mow frequently over the next few months, but we may not know that yard waste, such as those lawn clippings, is actually a stormwater pollutant that can have a big impact on water quality. Check out the CWEP video below starring the Sodfather, and learn about what you can do to help keep stormwater runoff clean as we do our summer landscaping!

Town of Morrisville wins a 2017 EPA Rain Catcher Award!

The Town of Morrisville, a member of the CWEP group, was recognized for their excellent efforts in stormwater management by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by winning the 2017 EPA Rain Catcher Award in the Municipal category!

The Town’s Northwest Park Project was created to provide a new neighborhood playground and public recreation spaces. They incorporated low-impact design elements such as green stormwater infrastructure to reduce the speed of water flowing through the area, as well as remove sediment and other pollutants like nutrients from the runoff. The parking lot and playground area were installed with permeable pavement to allow rainwater to soak through instead of flowing off, and also features a 3,000-gallon cistern to capture rainwater for use in irrigating the landscaping. There are also fun and educational signs highlighting the projects to the park visitors.

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Congratulations to the Town of Morrisville – keep up the great work!

To learn more about what the Town is doing in stormwater managment or about this project, please visit the Town website here.

 

 

How Natural Vegetation Creates Stream Buffers to Protect Waterbodies from Stormwater Pollution (and how you can help build one!)

What is a stream buffer?Image result for riparian buffer

Stream (also called riparian) buffers are strips of trees and other vegetation that:

  • improve water quality by filtering pollutants from stormwater runoff such as oil, fertilizers, pesticides, and dog waste;
  • reduce flooding and erosion by stabilizing stream banks;
  • moderate stream temperature and sunlight, keeping fish and other aquatic life healthy;
  • provide nesting and foraging habitat for many species of birds and animals.

You can help stream buffers purify our water by planting native trees and bushes along your stream or ditch, especially if the bank is bare or eroding. If you already have trees or shrubs along your waterway, simply leave it alone!

Mowing, cutting, and removing buffer vegetation may be regulated in your area, so check with your local government before undertaking landscaping or other projects within 100 feet of any water conveyances. (Selective cutting of understory shrubs and scrub by hand is usually allowed in very small amounts, but it is better to let the vegetation continue its natural regeneration process, which will allow trees to mature, form a canopy, and prevent undergrowth naturally.) Continue reading